Posts tagged Mozilla

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New Add-on: Remind Me Of That Page

I just made a new add-on that I believe you people might like. It is an add-on to help remember to check back on a page at a different date. Have you ever been in one of those situations reading a web page and thought that you needed to check back there in 15 days or next year, and totally forgot to do it? Well, this add-on is for you.

While we Blink, we lose the Web

Sources claim that Microsoft is abandoning EdgeHTML and building a Blink/Chromium based browser. This might be a good business decision for Microsoft but it is a disastrous advancement for the Web. In this short post, I will make a case for why we’re losing the Web and how in a Blink, all we love about our Web will be owned and controlled by a single entity.

Reading blogs with Thunderbird

I’ve always been a big fan of blogging and noticed in the recent years that I really dislike how social networks displaced the blogosphere as the main form of social interaction on the web. I believe that blogging decentralizes power by giving each author control over their content and leads to relationship networks that mimic how humans work better than algorithmically generated timelines.

When I decided to return to blog reading, I choose The Old Reader as my main blogging client, after I started noticing more and more people talking about Feedly, I decided to give it a try and ended up using it as my main client for many months. I think both The Old Reader and Feedly are awesome but something happened just after I decided to delete/deactivate my Facebook account (a topic for a different post). I logged to Feedly using Facebook and I think something went bonkers because I was logged out of all my instances in all my devices, and couldn’t get back in. So, I decided to maybe find a solution for my blogging needs that was not tied to a Cloud-based SaaS, something that would be under my control and as some people saw on twitter:

I moved back using Mozilla Thunderbird as my main mail client. Thunderbird can also read blog feeds and thats what this post is all about.

Mozilla Thunderbird showing blogs

Mozilla Thunderbird showing blogs

So come with me to learn more about how to set it up and also to get a copy of my OPML feed with the list of blogs I am following.

Agorama, View Source, Mozilla Festival & Redecentralize Party

Entering MozFest

Entering MozFest

This was a busy month for me here in London with four great events happenining all close to one another, which was awesome because I was feeling a little bored. Instead of doing a little travelogue of the events, I’d rather talk about what were my perspectives and ideas for joining them and what I think are the important trends that we should be paying attention right now while also highlighting what I think is great from each gathering of course.

Chronologically, the first event was the Agorama co-op meetup that happened on the 18th of October, followed by View Source 2018, then Mozilla Festival and ending with the Redecentralize Party but to follow the little journey I have planned for you in this blog post we need to use a different order and like most things, it starts with MozFest.

Mozilla Festival

Entering MozFest

Entering MozFest

Mozilla Festival 2018

It is hard to describe MozFest for those that have never been there or even saw the pictures. The best I can say it is like a festival, like burning man or coachella, but for the intersections of networks, culture and digital realm. It is a chaotic ambient, where ideas storm and collide and beautiful things are made. Some of these things are like little seeds that will grow all over our beautiful planet.

Three years ago, I remember MozFest having 1500 attendees of which 500 were facilitators. That means that for each three people in the festival, one was there to help you learn something, unlock some skill, or build up some idea. This leads to a very powerful and empowering event. I don’t have the numbers for this year but I believe it was similar.

BrazilJS booth experience for Mozilla Community

This post covers my thoughts on our BrazilJS booth experience. Our booth is always one of the most popular ones at BrazilJS, not only because it has free coffee but also because it has a really engaging team and activities, in this brief post I will list some of the sucessful actions that the community team present at the event took that could be replicated elsewhere.

What is your dream for the Web?

Our booth rear (and only) wall was made of glass panes that formed the Firefox logo. Juliana from the Altos Eventos crew had an idea to bring bright permanent markers and decorate the glass. This idea evolved into an call to action for the conference attendees: “What is your dream for the Web?”.

our wall

our wall

This call to action was spread on our social networks and also word of mouth as attendees visited our booth. It was pretty sucessful and in the end we had a very livelly wall with different languages and messages. This action brought attendees and Mozilla together in their shared dreams for the Web. I believe this should be replicated in community oriented events as it brings a playful tone to otherwise boring corporate booths.

young dreamer

young dreamer

Rio Web Fest

Vista do Rio

Vista do Rio

What it is

Rio Web Fest is a full day of practical activities focused on digital skills and technological exploration.

Why it is important

There is a lack of events focused on new digital skills and exploring creativity in Rio. There are a lot of events for professional development and web technology but nothing that caters to this underrepresented group of new digital citizens. People who are just learning new digital skills have no way to network with each other and not many places to connect with mentors and facilitators.

Instead of throwing an event focused on acquiring new digital skills, we decided to run an event focused on producing new original content (through remixing, interventions or exploratory methods). Our one rule was that all activities must be hands-on and practical, learners and facilitators would focus on experimentation and having fun. This was not only a celebration of Rio Mozilla Club, but also an opportunity for learners from different venues to connect to one another and establish new positive relationships.

Planning a Privacy Day for a Mozilla Club

In this post we’ll share how we organized our Privacy Day here at Rio Mozilla Club, you can use, remix and adapt this to your own setting.

We have two types of activities going on during one of our club meetings.

  • Micro-activities: these are quite simple and only require a flip-chart, sharpie pens or similar and post-it notes. They usually take about 5 minutes to complete.
  • Activities: these are the same activities you find at the Web Literacy Basics curriculum. Most activities take about 1 hour to complete. For the Privacy Day we used activities from the Expanded Privacy Curriculum that is currently in testing phase.

In our events we tend to do a little roller-coaster ride oscillating between micro-activities and full activities to keep the pace cool.

Tools for causing impact

One silly badly written planning matrix

One silly badly written planning matrix

More impact through coordinated planning

We all want to cause impact with our actions but sometimes we don’t have the experience or tools needed to manage our actions. Mozillians are very good at causing impact as can be seen by our actions around the world. In this brief post we’ll add one extra tool to our repository with which we’ll break our desire to make impact into manageable and mensurable bits. There are many tools and workflows we can use, this is just a tool that you can adapt to your own usage.

The main advantage of using this tool is that it allows you to plan for the impact you want to promote and also to be sure you achieved it. In this sense this is not only good for your future actions but also for metrics. The Participation Team uses OKRs for its planning which can be easily extracted from these matrices :-)

MozFest 2015

MozFest 2015 group photo

MozFest 2015 group photo

So it was that awesome part of the year again, the one time we all wait for, Mozilla Festival time! This was my second time being a part of this amazing event (you can read more about my first encounter with it here) and this time I was a pathfinder there.

There were 1700 attendees at the event and I have the firm belief that if you pick a group of 20 random people there and asked them what is the Mozilla Festival you’d receive 20 different answers. There will be a common theme to the answers though which is the creative nature of the event.

Mozilla’s annual, hands-on festival (affectionately known as MozFest) is dedicated to forging the future of the open Web.

MozFest is a celebration of creativity, the Web and the people who ♡ it. It is the culmination of our motto of a Web made by users for users and a place where you can learn, explore and create new things and boldly take your Web stuff to places no one though sane before!

The famous tree

The famous tree

This event is not like you usual tech convening. MozFest is a practical event where instead of being passive watching someone talk, people engage in practical activities exploring new ideas, prototypes and connecting to other awesome people. Roughly one in three people were there as facilitators meaning they were there to help others. There were sessions about basically everything, from scaling a program such as the Mozilla TechSpeakers to learning how to play the musical instrument known as Pandeiro which is a frame drum from Brazil. The Mozilla Festival will have something for everyone.

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