Reading blogs with Thunderbird

I’ve always been a big fan of blogging and noticed in the recent years that I really dislike how social networks displaced the blogosphere as the main form of social interaction on the web. I believe that blogging decentralizes power by giving each author control over their content and leads to relationship networks that mimic how humans work better than algorithmically generated timelines.

When I decided to return to blog reading, I choose The Old Reader as my main blogging client, after I started noticing more and more people talking about Feedly, I decided to give it a try and ended up using it as my main client for many months. I think both The Old Reader and Feedly are awesome but something happened just after I decided to delete/deactivate my Facebook account (a topic for a different post). I logged to Feedly using Facebook and I think something went bonkers because I was logged out of all my instances in all my devices, and couldn’t get back in. So, I decided to maybe find a solution for my blogging needs that was not tied to a Cloud-based SaaS, something that would be under my control and as some people saw on twitter:

I moved back using Mozilla Thunderbird as my main mail client. Thunderbird can also read blog feeds and thats what this post is all about.

Mozilla Thunderbird showing blogs

Mozilla Thunderbird showing blogs

So come with me to learn more about how to set it up and also to get a copy of my OPML feed with the list of blogs I am following.

Agorama, View Source, Mozilla Festival & Redecentralize Party

Entering MozFest

Entering MozFest

This was a busy month for me here in London with four great events happenining all close to one another, which was awesome because I was feeling a little bored. Instead of doing a little travelogue of the events, I’d rather talk about what were my perspectives and ideas for joining them and what I think are the important trends that we should be paying attention right now while also highlighting what I think is great from each gathering of course.

Chronologically, the first event was the Agorama co-op meetup that happened on the 18th of October, followed by View Source 2018, then Mozilla Festival and ending with the Redecentralize Party but to follow the little journey I have planned for you in this blog post we need to use a different order and like most things, it starts with MozFest.

5 events in 1 week

Events

In the past 7 days I’ve been to 5 different events, this is a quick summary of my impressions regarding what I did at the events, not the event themselves (I plan to write more later).

Apple is hostile to small ISV and business

Apple

Maya is a hypotetical cupcake shop owner. Like many small business owners, she is trying her best to make it all work for her and her employees. Knowing that she needed a presence in the Apple App Store, but unable to afford a custom design from a development company, Maya hired a small shop specialized in providing business like her with a good enough app to enable her to connect with her customers with a price that she could afford. She was happy, so were her clients, but now Apple changed her policies for the App Store and her app is in danger of being removed for not being original enough.

These type of little ISV building apps for small business owners with prices much more reasonable than those practices by bespoke solution developers have their days numbered. Apparently Apple does not consider them a valid citizen of the App Store developer community. With the recent changes in their policies, Apple has the right to ban apps that appear to have been created by a template/generational app.

Programmers are miniscientists

ideas, quotes

In this sense a programmer is a miniscientist. Scientists create approximate models for some idealized version of the world to make predictions about it. As long as the model’s predictions come true, everything is fine; when the predicted events differ from the actual ones, scientists revise their models to reduce the discrepancy. In a similar vein, when programmers are given a task, they create a first design, turn it into code, evaluate it with actual users, and iteratively refine the design until the program’s behavior closely matches the desired product.

Fantastic quote from how to design programs, one of the best books about programming ever released.